Caring for Ailing Parents

portrait of asian father and son.

Parents care for children, and then children grow up to become parents and care for their own children.  That’s the natural order of things—except when it isn’t.

Sometimes parents cannot care well for themselves, and need others to help. This is when children, purely out of love and concern, often begin to care for a parent.  Sometimes the caregiving journey is short-lived, because the need for care is temporary—such as when a parent has surgery or goes through treatment to regain health.  Sometimes it’s a long journey because the parent has a chronic illness such as dementia, or the after-effects of a stroke. When a child cares for an ailing parent, how is the parent/child relationship affected, and what can the child do to make the journey easier?

Continue reading

8 Unselfish Ways to Put Yourself First

Our CaregiverU Program Director, Faith Unger, has a great mantra: “Caregiving is a marathon, not a sprint.”  All too often, caregivers are thrust into the role of taking care of a family member, with little warning and no training.

Wright at receptionAccording to the American Psychological Association, it is estimated that informal caregivers – typically spouses or adult children – provide 80 percent of the long-term care in the case of diseases such as Alzheimer’s.  Their 2003 study found that caregivers had a 23 percent higher level of stress hormones and a 15 percent lower level of antibody responses than non-caregivers.

Caregiving also takes a psychological toll. According to the National Family Caregivers Association, the roughly one out of four caregivers who care for a family member for at least 36 hours a week – basically making it a full-time job – are more likely to show signs of depression or anxiety.  Relative to peers who don’t provide on-going care, spouses can be depressed or anxious six times more often; adult children suffer these problems twice as often.

Continue reading

May Is Older Americans Month

May Is Older Americans Month

prom_luluThe month of May represents national “Older Americans Month,” when communities across the country recognize older Americans for their contributions and demonstrate the nation’s commitment to helping them stay healthy and active.

This year, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Older Americans Act, communities are focusing on how older adults are taking charge of their health, engaging in their communities, and making a positive impact in the lives of others.  President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Older Americans Act into law in July 1965. Since that time, the Act has provided a nationwide aging services network and funding that helps older adults live with dignity in the communities of their choice for as long as possible.

While AGE of Central Texas provides programs, education, and resources to older adults and their caregivers year-round, Older Americans Month offers an opportunity to emphasize how senior adults can access the home- and community-based services they need to live independently.  We are honored to be a part of the live of the older adults and family caregivers of this community, and to join them on their journey.

Thumbing Your Way to Health

large_article_im1466_Top_5_high-tech_health_trends_to_watch_in_2014What is better than learning how to use a smartphone for the first time?

How about learning to make your mind and body healthier with your device? How about taking a class from your peers? Then catching up with them over a cup of coffee after class?

The marriage between health and technology is becoming stronger every day. With the upcoming reign of wearable tech, the relationship between our digital devices and our bodies will grow. The AGE Computer Lab is here to help our community navigate it.  Continue reading

Does a license make a difference?

How does someone go about deciding if an Adult Day Care center (ADC) is a good fit for a loved one? There are many factors, but one important consideration is the question of licensing.

We understand that it’s not easy to entrust a loved one’s well-being to strangers. That is why licensing is important to AGE of Central Texas– we want to do everything we can to reassure family caregivers that our Adult Day Health Centers are safe and held to the highest standards.

In Texas, the Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) licenses and surveys adult day care facilities to ensure compliance with state and federal laws and regulations to protect individuals who are receiving these long-term care services.

Some of the requirements that licensed adult day care centers follow include: Continue reading

Portrait of a Struggle: Still Alice and Early Memory Loss

The AGE of Central Texas Blog is proud to present the following post by K.C. Lawrence, our new Early Memory Loss Support Program Director. She reflects on how Still Alice illuminates her work with Early Memory Loss patients, and how her work, in turn, sheds light on the novel and the film.

The film Still Alice is based on a book about a Harvard linguistics professor diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.  It chronicles the rapid progression of the disease from Alice’s point of view:  over two years, the disease takes her from working full-time to not recognizing her children.  The story covers her struggles at work, changes in her relationships, and how she grapples with losing her independence.  Most of all, the story shines light on the changes in how a person with cognitive impairment views herself, those close to her, and her world. Continue reading

Open Letter to Caregivers

We are proud to present a post by AGE’s Caregiver Information and Resource Director. Hector Rodriguez joined AGE last year and since then he’s been providing crucial consultations and referrals to caregivers from all over Central Texas and beyond. 

~~~

This is for you, the Caregiver.

I’ve seen it in your eyes, I’ve heard it in your voice, and I’ve read it in your emails…You’re stressed. You’re scared.  You’re exhausted.  You’re at wit’s end.  Every time I speak to you, caregiver, I am taken back to a time where I was also stressed, scared, exhausted, and at my wit’s end.  You are constantly trying to remember the happier days.  The days when you did not have to worry about your parent wandering or getting lost.  The days when you did not have to change your parent’s diaper.  The days when you did not have to lift your spouse in and out of bed and in and out of the shower.  No rest for the weary.

You are a caregiver.

Why did you become a caregiver you ask? You didn’t ask for it.  You didn’t want to be one. I was only 22 years-old when I became a dementia caregiver, and until then all I had cared about was my college exams, our next fightin’ Texas Aggie football game, preparing for the LSAT, and the next keg-party. I am sure you are thinking that these are supposed to be the golden years for you and your spouse.  You were planning to be take cruises in the Mediterranean, maybe pick up a hobby together, or visit every vineyard in Napa Valley.  You never expected to be re-teaching your spouse on how to use a toothbrush. Continue reading