AFA Offers Online Guide to Long-Term Care

About 70 percent of individuals older than age 65 will require at least some type of long-term care services during their lifetime. Often, cognitive and physical impairments resulting from Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia prompt the need for long-term care. So for those encountering this issue, what different types of long-term care are available? How can families ease the transition to residential settings? How do you go about paying for long-term care? And is there insurance available? The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) now offers the answers to these and other questions in an extensive guide to long-term care on its Web site.

Click here to learn more.

AARP: Prepare to Care

A Planning Guide for Families

Today, 30 million households are providing care for an adult over the age of 50-and that number is expected to double over the next 25 years. If you have not yet begun to discuss a caregiving plan with your family, it’s not too late. It doesn’t matter who starts the conversation. What really matters is that every family has the opportunity to talk about and create a caregiving plan for their loved ones based on the needs and wishes of those who will be receiving the care.

The AARP Foundation’s Prepare to Care: A Planning Guide for Families, Each of the following five steps available for download below in PDF format (requires free Adobe Reader), includes information on how to get started, questions to ask and where to find basic resources. It also includes forms that you and your caregiving team can fill out and keep on file, so that you will have all the pertinent information about your loved one and his/her financial affairs, health needs, household matters, and more in one place. Don’t be discouraged if you can’t answer every question or fill in every blank. The important thing is to start the conversation in a way that works for you and your family.

The comprehensive guide is divided into five steps:

Step 1: Prepare to Talk
Step 2: Form Your Team
Step 3: Assess Needs
Step 4: Make a Plan
Step 5: Take Action

Click here to read more or to download the guide from AARP.org.

Holiday Visits May Be the Time to Discuss Home Care

From the Right at Home website.

For most of us, winter holidays are wrapped up with family traditions. Mom’s top-secret turkey stuffing recipe and beautifully decorated table symbolize Thanksgiving. Heirloom ornaments adorn the Christmas tree. A menorah passed down through the generations is a special Chanukah symbol. Diwali lamps brought from India by elders help connect U.S.-born children with their heritage. And during Eid ul-Fitr, senior loved ones are honored during the feasting that marks the end of Ramadan.

No matter how far we have moved from home, most Americans want to spend the special winter holidays with loved ones. Busy airports overflow with travelers, and there is that special moment when we ring the doorbell to our childhood home and are greeted by the smell of baking cookies and hugs from parents and grandparents.

But for many families this year, holiday visits will include the realization that their senior loved one’s condition is changing. The house isn’t as spotless as Mom has always kept it. Maybe Dad—always so conscious of his personal grooming—looks as if he hasn’t shaved in a few days. Or perhaps the holiday dinner is several hours late because Grandma forgot to turn on the oven.

Read more at the Right at Home website.