Study: Alzheimer’s risk spikes 157% with heavy smoking

If you needed another reason to quite smoking, well, here you go…-SP

By Mary Brophy Marcus, USA TODAY
Heavy smoking in midlife more than doubles your odds of developing Alzheimer’s disease, a Kaiser Permanente study said Monday.
The study is the first to examine the long-term consequences of heavy smoking on Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia, says the study’s principal investigator, Rachel Whitmer, a research scientist with Kaiser Permanente in Oakland.

From 1994 to 2008, researchers evaluated the records of 21,123 men and women in midlife and continued following them, on average, for 23 years. Compared with non-smokers, those who had smoked two packs of cigarettes a day increased their risk of developing Alzheimer’s by more than 157% and had a 172% higher risk of developing vascular dementia — the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s. The research is published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Read the full article at USA Today’s website.

Study shows cigarette smoking a risk for Alzheimer’s disease

A UCSF analysis of published studies on the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and smoking indicates that smoking cigarettes is a significant risk factor for the disease. After controlling for study design, quality of the journals, time of publication, and tobacco industry affiliation of the authors, the UCSF research team also found an association between tobacco industry affiliation and the conclusions of individual studies. Industry-affiliated studies indicated that smoking protects against the development of AD, while independent studies showed that smoking increased the risk of developing the disease.

Read more at the University of California, San Francisco website.

Study Shows Alzheimer’s Hits Earlier in Smokers, Drinkers

By KATHLEEN FACKELMANN
USA Today
Apr. 17, 2008

Heavy smokers and drinkers develop Alzheimer’s years before people who don’t drink or smoke as much, a new report says.

The study, presented Wednesday at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Chicago, suggests heavy drinking and smoking might be accelerating damage to the brain, which could lead to Alzheimer’s.

ut the flip side of the study is a message of hope: People who cut back or stop habits such as excessive smoking or drinking might reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer’s at a younger age. Instead of struggling with forgetfulness at age 59, such people might delay symptoms until age 65 or 70, says researcher Ranjan Duara of the Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach.

Duara and his colleagues examined 938 people ages 60 and older with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, a disease that causes confusion, memory loss and behavioral problems. The team asked family members to provide patients’ histories of drinking and smoking. Then the team identified patients who had APOE4, a gene that increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s late in life.

Read more here: ABC News